Health

Response to the VET Student Loans Bill 2016, the VET Student Loans (Consequential Amendments and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2016, and the VET Student Loans (Charges) Bill 2016

Catholic Health Australia's response to the new VET Student Loan proposals and the impact such changes will have on Catholic Health, Aged and Community Care services in Australia. CHA aims to ensure sustainable, high quality healthcare in Australia - something that commences with effective, high quality entry level healthcare education programs.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

Submission to the Human Services Inquiry – Identifying Sectors for Reform – Response to Preliminary Findings Report

Catholic Health Australia's response to the Preliminary Findings Report of the Productivity Commission’s Introducing Competition and Informed User Choice in Human Services: Identifying Sectors for Reform.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

Submission to the Review of Pharmacy Remuneration and Regulation

Catholic Health Australia's submission to the Pharmacy Remuneration and Regulation Review.

The submission outlines recommendations for changes to current regulation and remuneration arrangements to allow hospital pharmacies to deliver care that is appropriate to and consistent with the clinical complexity of consumers that are treated in a hospital setting.

Please follow this link to read the submission. 

Submission to Senate Standing Committees on Economics, re: Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016

Catholic Health Australia's submission to the Senate Standing Commitees on Ecnomics in response to the Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016 makes recommendations with respect to Schdule 7 - Abolishing the Naitonal Health Performance Authority, Schedule 8 - Aged Care and Schedule 20 - Psychiatric Confinement.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

Submission to the Human Services Inquiry - Identifying Sectors for Reform

Submission to the Human Services Inquiry - Identifying Sectors for Reform

Catholic Health Australia's submission to the Productivity Commission's public inquiry into the increased application of competition, contestability and informed user choice to human services. Catholic Health Australia is strongly of the view that both hospitals and aged care are services where greater competition and consumer choice and control has the potential to significantly benefit consumers and taxpayers. This submission separately addresses issues relating to both hospital and aged care services.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

Research Priorities for the MRFF: Australian Medical Research and Innovation Two Year Priorities

Research Priorities for the MRFF
Australian Medical Research and Innovation Two Year Priorities

Catholic Health Australia (CHA) has identified evidence-based holistic models of care for end-of-life and chronic disease, including mental health, as major gaps in Australia’s health system. To deliver this, structural reform through embedding research into health service delivery must be supported. Although a key recommendation of the Strategic Review of Health and Medical Research (the McKeon review), this has largely not happened. Health service research underpins our ability to identify unwarranted variation in the quality, efficacy and efficiency of healthcare delivery as well as to ensure that scarce resources are optimally allocated. A self-learning/improving healthcare system can only be delivered through investment in people dedicated to this task using key infrastructure including clinical registries and clinical trial capabilities.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

 

Strategies for the MRFF: Australian Medical Research and Innovation Five Year Strategy

Strategies for the MRFF
Australian Medical Research and Innovation Five Year Strategy
CHA considers that important gaps exist in both Australia’s approach to health and medical research. The MRFF provides a unique opportunity to fund health sector identified priority areas in a manner that addresses these gaps.
Current gaps include insufficient:
 
- Funding to support both research projects and core infrastructure including clinical trial capabilities, clinical registries (that enhance the existing hospital based Safety and quality activities)
- Funding for core clinical research support staff such as those running the registries and undertaking clinical trials.
- Funding for hospital-based clinical staff to ensure they have stable financial support to allow them to undertake research as a part of and not separate to their clinical responsibilities.
- Funding for multi-disciplinary teams to ensure outcomes are person-centred and holistic.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

 

CHA's submission to the Private Health Insurance Review

CHA's submission to the Private Health Insurance Review

CHA welcomes the opportunity to provide a submission to the Government’s consultation on private health insurance regulation. Private health insurance plays an important role in Australia’s health care system, particularly in funding the 40% of hospital episodes that take place in the private sector, as well as in providing cover for a range of community based health services including dental, optical and physio-therapy services. 

At the end of September 2015, over 11.3 million people or around 47.3% of the population were covered for hospital treatment; and around 13.3 million people or 55.8% of the population were covered for general treatment. The proportion of the population with private health insurance has been relative stable (albeit with a slight increase) since the rapid increase in membership in 1999 and 2000.

Rising premiums, reductions to subsidy support and the increasing proportion of policies with exclusions are acting to reduce the value proposition for those who hold private health insurance. Therefore it is timely to review the regulatory and funding framework supporting private health insurance.

Please follow this link to read the submission.

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